Some Kind of Walk

I am now a week back from walking the last third of the Northwest Mounted Police Trail. My wife and I walked about 110 km of a 300 plus km trail. The trail runs from Wood Mountain Park to Fort Walsh in the Cypress Hills. It was established by the NWMP in order to keep the peace in an area frequented by “Wolvers” from south of the border in the late 19th century in what is now southern Saskatchewan. These folk were known by this name since they killed bison, poisoned the meat and then collected the hides of wolves who ate this. They ran a booze business on the side, selling to Native Americans who were in the midst of losing a way of life as the bison disappeared from the land, and as the Canadian government waited upon them to starve, until they finally agreed to sign treaties in a desperate attempt to find a way in this new reality. This patrol trail across the praire is wet with tears.

How is it that I found myself on this trail? My friend Matthew Anderson, a theologian and documentary producer invited me and my wife and we said yes. You can learn more about this at Matthew’s site. Matthew is a scholar of pilgrimage and was piqued by the observation that people who research pilgrimage often write and research European trails, but seemed little interested in North American sites. He grew up in southern Saskatchewan and so knew of this trail and of its significance. He thought it especially important to visit in light of the recent report from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which speaks of the continuing need for First Nations and Settlers to work toward renewed relationships of truth, accountability, justice, and concern for the land.

I learned much on this walk. We arrived on a non-walk day. In the evening, the author Candace Savage spoke to us of the sad history of this place. I bought her book and asked her to sign it. She did and wrote “welcome home” above her signature. This was a bit odd, since I am not from Saskatchewan. I grew up in central Alberta, in what is called “parkland.” But as I walked across this bald prairie, replete with breath taking coulees, horizons that spoke of the Creator’s breadth of fierce mercy, and a sky that glistened with the stark clarity of a diamond, I found myself breathless. Every now and then I would stop, and look, and find myself with hands on my hips: just looking. It reminded me of my dad, raised on the prairies, who would do this from time to time on our farm. We would be on our way to look at the cows, or check the grain, or whatever, and he would stop – like a man with all the time in the world – and look to the horizon with hands on hips. And here I was, reprising his posture, a posture formed in his southern Alberta by like surroundings. And then Candace’s note rang true. This was a homecoming on foreign territory.

All territory is foreign to us. We experience it as a home-becoming when we walk it. Walking is a holy venture: prayer on feet trod with attention to the marvel and miracle walking is. Children who first learn to walk and people who have lost their ability to walk know so very well that walking is a wonder. Walking is wonder-ful. As I walked this trail I found myself over and over again. I saw myself in my fellow pilgrims who both looked forward to a day’s end while they wished it went on forever. I heard myself in the Swainson hawks who prayed us across the prairies. I sniffed out myself in the sweet sage that bore witness to hope on hard ground. I felt my skin as I caressed teepee ring rocks, reminders that this land that has adopted me is my elder, my mother. I tasted myself in fresh bread made by farmers who invited us in, with prairie hospitality. As an ancient sage noted: we are grains of wheat, crushed, wetted, fired and broken to become food for the hungry.

I have walked for a time. I have walked with others, with the land, and by myself. I am richer for it, and now wonder how to best invest what I have accrued from this time. I am confident that a pathway will open up, as pathways do: mysteriously.

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Thanks to Matthew Anderson for this photo!

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10 thoughts on “Some Kind of Walk

  1. Marie Taylor says:

    what a wonderful experience! and one that you will always remember. 🙂

  2. Mary says:

    What a grace filled experience!

  3. As one who has walked many foreign places and found a home, thank you for writing this!

  4. shoreacres says:

    On one level, there was much to learn here, simply as matters of fact. I know Grand Coulee Dam, but had no idea how a coulee was formed. I know of the Trail of Tears in this country, but knew nothing of such trails in Canada. I did have to smile at the mention of those scalawags crossing “the southern border.” A few hundred miles this way or that, and everything changes.

    I’ve always found it a little unusual that I never was particularly homesick while living in Africa, but once returned to the States, experienced a homesickness for Liberia so strongly that I eventually went back.

    And isn’t it interesting that so much of my time there was spent walking, especially to villages that could be reached no other way. I recognize that walker’s reality: being happy the day is over, and wanting it to go on forever.

    • agjorgenson says:

      Love this bit about homesickness. It is strange how places become ours the more we walk them. That is certainly true in Kitchener/Waterloo, where I have been walking home from work the last couple of years. The cities have really become part of my interior landscape in this way.

  5. I did so enjoy the photos as you posted them and kept thinking about the notion of pilgrimage in Canadian context. There is still so much of this country to see and I pray that you will have many more chances, so that I may continue to follow in your footsteps, however vicariously

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