Limping toward You

And then You come to me
again, and again, and again,
slipping Your words into the silence
of my speech. You right and write
my wrongs in strophes of
reconciliation, allowing
my ears to be hallowed
by Your cries; my
eyes to be sanctified by
the sight of Your tears
now made mine.

You are not
content to see
me face to face
but embrace me
from the inside out:
Your presence now my joy,
Your absence now my hope,
my words now my tongue
limping toward
You.

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4 thoughts on “Limping toward You

  1. shoreacres says:

    I was caught by “strophes of reconciliation,” and realized I had no firm idea what a strophe actually is. I wondered if it had any relationship to ‘apostrophe.’ It does, and I think is applies to your poem, beautifully. You may know all this, but…

    The word strophe comes from Greek strophe or “stanza. It meant “a turning,” — the section of an ode sung by the chorus in a Greek drama while literally turning, or changing directions. An apostrophe, according to the Online Etymology Dictionary, has a meaning beyond that of the punctuation mark. It also can refer to “”a turning aside of an orator in the course of a speech to address briefly some individual. It comes from the Greek apostrophos — a literal turning.

    That turning seems to be part of your poem — especially in that coming “again and again and again.” Somehow, the inclusion of “strophes of reconciliation” really added to the dynamism of the poem.

    • agjorgenson says:

      It is so interesting that this word caught you because it kind of just fell into the poem, and then I looked and thought, “Am I using this word correctly?” So, after doing a little reading up I found myself happy to discover that it fit exceedingly well! Glad to find out that you found it to be the same.

  2. Glad you included “your absence now my hope”….a nod to the experience of the cross in our experiences. Thank you!

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